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Just seen for 4 minutes at ferry

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Good afternoon,
These 3 warblers were very plentiful this spring. If you would like to see
pictures of each, they can be found at the link below.

https://www.jmeyerphotography.net/nashville-tennessee-orange-crowned-warblers-in-spring-22/


Jeremy Meyer
Franklin, Milwaukee
www.jmeyerphotography.net


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..also the FRGU is still there & there is a YHBB there as well.
Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkIdU0986> for Windows

From: traychi [email removed]
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2022 10:26 AM
To: [email removed][email removed]
Subject: [wisb] LARK BUNTING

Good afternoon,


LABU is still present at Milwaukee Lake Express ferry. Is out in the open often & even flew right at my feet & fed. Great views & appears that it will stick around feeding.

Good birding!!!


Tracy Chicobnas
Mil Co
Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkIdU0986> for Windows


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Good afternoon,


LABU is still present at Milwaukee Lake Express ferry. Is out in the open often & even flew right at my feet & fed. Great views & appears that it will stick around feeding.

Good birding!!!


Tracy Chicobnas
Mil Co
Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkIdU0986> for Windows


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We had to wait an hour, but at the Lake Ferry Terminal(Milwaukee)we got very good views of the male Lark Bunting. 5/23/22…11:15 AM

Kris Jungbluth

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Hello-
Least Bittern was seen at Lake Park on north side of Locust Bridge. around
10am Sunday

It was in a tree. Flew away and did not see where it landed.


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Hello,

Where in the Milwaukee area are Least Biterns being seen/heard? Thank you!

KAREN JOHNSON
Milwaukee County
BayView Area



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Hi all,
Birding some of the lakefront in Milwaukee this morning a stop at the Lake
Express was well worth it. A Lark Bunting, male had just been seen by Jym
M. but was not currently being seen. What a great bird and find! I thought
I would hang around to see if it returned and after about 30 minutes I
decided to check out other places along the lake. After checking some
beaches I returned to the Lake Express and once again, I had just missed
the Lark Bunting. This time I was going to stick around for a while. A
short time had passed and I spotted the bunting in a nearby small tree. It
moved around some and gave nice views for just a couple of minutes and then
was out of sight. It also fed with some House Sparrows on the lawn near the
building area in the shade. A Wisconsin life bird for me, #367. I will say,
it has been a great year so far for state life birds, I hope this
continues. It was a sunny day, with a cool breeze and temps around 50
degrees.

http://www.windowtowildlife.com/lark-bunting-at-the-lake-express-in-milwaukee-wisconsin-on-may-23-2022/

Thanks and good birding,

Jim Edlhuber
Town of Genesee Waukesha Co.
windowtowildlife.com


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Also, you still have a narrow window of time before school lets out for the
summer. It might be relatively easy to figure out when these boys come
home from school in the afternoon. Perhaps once you have this figured out,
you and some friends/fellow birders could station yourselves in the park at
the time when you usually witness this, and try to talk to the boys? If
they're receptive, you might try to share some interesting information
about cranes and encourage them to be the crane's "protectors" (as opposed
to starting off with a scolding). Many urban kids have a pretty tenuous
connection with nature, and sometimes they literally "don't know any
better." If the kids are hostile/not receptive, then you and your friends
might need to figure out where they live and pay a visit to the parents. I
would suggest never doing any of this alone, lest people think you're a
"creeper" interested in preying on kids.
All this being said, if you and some companions could shoot some photos or
videos of the kids harassing the cranes, those photos would be like gold
when you're trying to enlist the aid of the appropriate agency, and might
be especially valuable if you end up talking to some defensive parents
whose first instinct is to deny that their kids would ever do anything
wrong.

But I would suggest acting quickly before school lets out, or these kids
will be in the park at completely random hours during the summer and it
will be much harder to catch them in the act. If you do enlist the aid of
the Parks Department (or other agency), I would try to follow up with them
to see that they acted on your complaint. Your idea of alerting other
adults in the neighborhood -- whether you do it or your property manager is
willing to do it -- is a good one.

Hope this is helpful, and thanks for caring.

Diane Harvey
Windsor/DeForest
Dane County

On Mon, May 23, 2022 at 9:48 AM kevin seidel [email removed]
wrote:

> I agree with Brooke. I’d also call the appropriate law enforcement agency.
> Thank you and good luck.
> Kevin Seidel
> Onalaska WI
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 23, 2022, at 9:22 AM, brooke haycraft [email removed]
> wrote:
> >
> > Figure out who the kids parents are and let them know. Also, call the
> Parks
> > and Rec department for the park the cranes are residing in and let them
> > know of the situation.
> >> On Mon, May 23, 2022, 7:47 AM Mary Cullen [email removed]
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >> Hi folks
> >>
> >> There’s a problem at my apartment complex. (Parquelynn Village)
> >> Fifth grade boys are chasing Sandhills on this property with their bikes
> >> (and I’m too old to chase after the kids……)
> >> The Sandhills have been nesting right next door at Nashotah Park for
> >> several years (since I’ve been living here).
> >> I plan to go to management and point out that these birds are protected
> by
> >> Federal Law and request that the entire complex be notified.
> >> I’d like any input as to they best way to handle this.
> >> The birds seem to be getting more nervous. They’ve always been pretty
> low
> >> key.The residents are great about letting them be so the Cranes are
> >> habituated to the normal activity here.
> >>
> >> Mary Cullen
> >> Waukesha
> >> 262-370-8094####################
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> >> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
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I agree with Brooke. I’d also call the appropriate law enforcement agency.
Thank you and good luck.
Kevin Seidel
Onalaska WI

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 23, 2022, at 9:22 AM, brooke haycraft [email removed] wrote:
>
> Figure out who the kids parents are and let them know. Also, call the Parks
> and Rec department for the park the cranes are residing in and let them
> know of the situation.
>> On Mon, May 23, 2022, 7:47 AM Mary Cullen [email removed]
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Hi folks
>>
>> There’s a problem at my apartment complex. (Parquelynn Village)
>> Fifth grade boys are chasing Sandhills on this property with their bikes
>> (and I’m too old to chase after the kids……)
>> The Sandhills have been nesting right next door at Nashotah Park for
>> several years (since I’ve been living here).
>> I plan to go to management and point out that these birds are protected by
>> Federal Law and request that the entire complex be notified.
>> I’d like any input as to they best way to handle this.
>> The birds seem to be getting more nervous. They’ve always been pretty low
>> key.The residents are great about letting them be so the Cranes are
>> habituated to the normal activity here.
>>
>> Mary Cullen
>> Waukesha
>> 262-370-8094####################
>> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
>> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
>> To UNSUBSCRIBE or SUBSCRIBE, use the Wisbirdn web interface at:
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>>
>>
>>
>
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>
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Figure out who the kids parents are and let them know. Also, call the Parks
and Rec department for the park the cranes are residing in and let them
know of the situation.
On Mon, May 23, 2022, 7:47 AM Mary Cullen [email removed]
wrote:

>
> Hi folks
>
> There’s a problem at my apartment complex. (Parquelynn Village)
> Fifth grade boys are chasing Sandhills on this property with their bikes
> (and I’m too old to chase after the kids……)
> The Sandhills have been nesting right next door at Nashotah Park for
> several years (since I’ve been living here).
> I plan to go to management and point out that these birds are protected by
> Federal Law and request that the entire complex be notified.
> I’d like any input as to they best way to handle this.
> The birds seem to be getting more nervous. They’ve always been pretty low
> key.The residents are great about letting them be so the Cranes are
> habituated to the normal activity here.
>
> Mary Cullen
> Waukesha
> 262-370-8094####################
> You received this email because you are subscribed to the Wisconsin
> Birding Network (Wisbirdn).
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> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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> http://www.freelists.org/list/wisbirdn
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>
>
>

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Jym M noticed the bunting earlier this morning. It's been present off and
on for about 40 minutes. Be patient. It flies off far east into the berm
and then may come back behind the fence line looking into the east
sunlight. We did get lucky for a few moments and it came and hopped around
on the northern fence line. Good luck!

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Hi folks

There’s a problem at my apartment complex. (Parquelynn Village)
Fifth grade boys are chasing Sandhills on this property with their bikes (and I’m too old to chase after the kids……)
The Sandhills have been nesting right next door at Nashotah Park for several years (since I’ve been living here).
I plan to go to management and point out that these birds are protected by Federal Law and request that the entire complex be notified.
I’d like any input as to they best way to handle this.
The birds seem to be getting more nervous. They’ve always been pretty low key.The residents are great about letting them be so the Cranes are habituated to the normal activity here.

Mary Cullen
Waukesha
262-370-8094####################
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Currently behind the ferry building. Also a Laughing Gull but it flew north
already. Worth checking the lakeshore from ferry north to Art Museum. Have
a great day!

Jeremy Meyer
Franklin, Milwaukee
www.jmeyerphotography.net


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Apologies for the spacing issues in the original post...
Yesterday (May 21) myself, Quentin Yoerger, and Aaron Haycraft, AKA Team Good Godwits, ran our Big Day for the 2022 Great Wisconsin Birdathon. After a bizarre spring which brought a surge of neotropical migrants into southern Wisconsin in April and held them there for a couple weeks until the floodgates were open as wide as could be by several days in a row of 90s with strong south winds, we didnt know how things would go. We rely on late migrants arriving and early migrants lingering to find a lot of species and it seemed like that would be very difficult this year. So, we built a route which had a heavy focus on birds on their breeding territory and then some migrants later in the day. Things worked out very well as we ended up recording 196 species one shy of our best ever mark. This is the third route that we have found 190+ species on. It was probably the best birding day in Wisconsin of all three of our lives, with two stunning finds in between many other fun birds. Below i
s a descriptive narrative of the day. Enjoy! And if you're inspired, you can donate in honor of our team to bird conservation in Wisconsin at: https://charity.pledgeit.org/t/glstV6omzD?createdfbclidAR02cLx7NUkb-VmwISQcnSczb4GuwxpuRF02TuC2hK4A_rlSam8EFGiulPI

We started at midnight near Shawano Lake and found our first target, Eastern Screech-Owl. Barred Owls were talkative and Great Horneds were not, a trend which would hold true for the remainder of the night. Temps were chilly but it was a beautiful windless night to be out. Migrant chips were steady, so we knew birds were moving. We continued west and found a major target bird, a Northern Saw-whet Owl in a large conifer swamp south of Gresham. Efforts for Long-eared Owl came up empty, as they always do.

We arrived at Navarino Wildlife Area around 3am with plenty of time to work the marshes before the dawn chorus began. Another major target was cooperative, a Yellow Rail that we had staked out in the Navarino Sedge Meadow State Natural Area. In the flowages along McDonald Road we found Sora, Virginia Rail, and eventually both species of Bittern and Wilsons Snipe closer to daybreak. We finally caught up with a Great Horned Owl in the fields to the south, just before it was too light to hear them. A major highlight was just how abundant Whip-poor-wills are in this area. At times we joked about how we wish we could shut the Whip-poor-wills up to hear other species, but its fantastic that there are still some areas where this declining species thrives.

The dawn chorus is always my favorite part of a big day, giving that shot of energy you need after pulling an all-nighter. Our strategy is always to hit as many habitats as we can while birds are singing at their highest intensity, and Navarino is a wonderful place to do this with several habitat types in close proximity. Among many common species, we heard hoped-for Ruffed Grouse, Ring-necked Pheasant, Golden-winged Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on breeding territory as well as a few migrants like Canada Warbler and Swainsons Thrush. We easily saw the Ring-necked Ducks and Trumpeter Swans that breed on the flowages.
Just west of Navarino are the Wolf River Bottoms, and we stopped at the Highway 156 crossing and picked up Prothonotary Warbler on the northern edge of its range and a couple others like Brown Creeper. We birded our way north back toward Gresham and heard our stakeout Hooded Warbler (another species at the north edge of its range) plus some conifer swamp species including White-throated Sparrow in the same swamp we had found the Saw-whet in earlier.

We worked our way up to the deep woods of northern Shawano County where we picked up breeders including Yellow-rumped Warbler, Northern Parula, Black-throated Green Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Winter Wren, and Blue-headed Vireokey adds because most of these species are done migrating through in large numbers, and we never detected them again later in the day. We were lucky to spot a male Common Merganser sitting on a rock in the Wolf River, a great pickup since this early migrant has moved entirely out of the Green Bay area. We also watched a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks hunt which was a fun bonus and a makeup for missing them in their prime habitat in the Wolf River bottoms. Wind had picked up substantially now, which made hearing difficult and may have been the reason we missed some breeders such as Hermit Thrush and Purple Finch.

Next up was some large open areas in the northern part of Shawano County between Red River and Middle Village. We had hoped to check Eastern Meadowlark off the list and stopped the car when a medium-sized yellow bird was fluttering in the field on Mission Lake and East Town Hall Rds. A look in the binocs was initially confusing because this bird was not right for a meadowlark it was a WESTERN KINGBIRD!! We leisurely watched this rarity for about ten minutes and celebrated only the second time each of us have seen this species in Wisconsin. Seeing a rare bird that you know is present is awesome, but the thrill of finding a rarity is one of the most fun feelings in birding. After saying our thanks and goodbyes to the kingbird, we checked off other targets like Grasshopper Sparrow but missed Vesper Sparrow in multiple spots.

We headed east to Shawano Lake, which I consider one of the most under-birded locations in the state. This large lake right before the north woods is a magnet to migrating waterfowl but heavy boat traffic makes birding difficult during weekends. We added a nesting Osprey, Common and Black Terns, Bufflehead, two surprise Sanderlings at the County Park beach, and Red-headed Woodpeckers and a roosting Common Nighthawk in the large oaks at the County Park. We could not find any of the resident loons due to boat traffic and distortion and waves.

We continued working toward Green Bay, and the next stop was the wetland and grassland complex at Oneida Nation where we started at the pond along Reformatory Road. We added common shorebird species including Wilsons Phalarope, as well as our first Hooded Mergansers, Shovelers, Ruddy Ducks, and Lesser Scaup of the day. The grasslands added hunting Northern Harriers and a late Rough-legged Hawk among the common grassland breeding species. The Western Meadowlark that was present the past two years has not returned this year and we could not find Henslows Sparrow or Brewers Blackbird. We may have had the latter on a post way way way out in our scopes, but it was just too far away to be sure. The Oneida Nation has done a terrific job with restoration efforts here, and this location is only getting better as a regional birding hotspot.

Next it was time to hit lower Green Bay, a sure boost of our stats since we needed a lot of shorebirds and waterbirds. Various locations produced shorebirds we were hoping for including Hudsonian Godwits (Good Godwits our teams namesake cooperated!), White-rumped Sandpipers, Black-bellied Plovers, Ruddy Turnstones, and many others. We also scored on several lingering ducks despite the mass exodus which occurred in last weeks heatwave, including American Wigeon, American Black Duck, Canvasback, Red-breasted Merganser, and Greater Scaup. Shorebirds were occasionally ambushed by the local Peregrine Falcon, making sorting through them difficult but adding that key species to our list. Marshbirds that are much more common in the marshes of Green Bay than anywhere else in the region including Common Gallinule, Forsters Tern, and Yellow-headed Blackbird were easily found.

It was late afternoon and time to strategize as we sat at just short of 180 species. A big hole in our list was migrating passerines, so the natural thought was to try Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary. A sunny Saturday afternoon is the worst time to possibly try this due to the crowds of people and typical inactivity of birds during this time of day, but we had a tip that it was a good morning there for migrants. The beginning of our walk was very quiet but just past the Nature Center we found a very nice group of migrants in the sun and out of the wind and crowds including our first Bay-breasted Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Gray-cheeked Thrush, Philadelphia Vireo, and Olive-sided Flycatcher of the day. The success here was unexpected and made us realize that we were possibly on our way to having one of our better days ever in terms of a species total.

Next up was the UW-Green Bay campus where the Orchard Oriole was at its typical spot on the now closed golf course and hopefully soon-to-be restored oak savannah and a Coopers Hawk gave a lucky flyover. Speaking of lucky flyovers, we decided to spend a minute near the Union where there are a lot of spruce trees that have been hosting White-winged Crossbills during this incredible past winter and spring for this irruptive species. Although most of them have gone back north, some birders have still been reporting them so we thought it was worth a shot. After a couple minutes a pair flew over calling, a great addition of a species we have never recorded on a big day. We would surprisingly end up missing Pine Siskin on the day, but this was a welcome substitute.

With the clock ticking and our morales high, we headed to Manitowoc to close out the day. We were able to relocate the Common Goldeneye others had seen earlier in the Little Manitowoc Slough as well as the Willet in the impoundment. A second Willet joined and the two were very loud the whole time we were there. There werent many other shorebirds around so we scoped the gulls on the breakwall in hopes that a flock of Whimbrels might migrate in on this evening with East winds off the lake (alas, they never did). Two Lesser Black-backed and an Iceland Gull made nice additions and we were content to start walking back to our cars after a really fun day and a rock-solid total of 195 species. Little did we know, it wasnt over. A few moments later, a bird with a strange silhouette in the fading light flew overwas it a duck? Maybe, but why did it look so different? A cormorant? No. An ibis? No. It then gave a really cool bizarre call that none of us are familiar with so we knew this was a
rare bird that we had to figure out. It called another couple times and then banked, revealing white wing watches and a bright pink bill a BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK!! It settled down in the harbor and then flew right over us into the impoundment to roost for the night. A second huge surprise of the day and a story book way to cap it off. This species was extremely rare in Wisconsin until about a decade ago, and is now being seen increasingly, although its still a rather rare bird in the state. As giddy as could be, we ended our day on that high note with 196 species as darkness fell over Lake Michigan.

The annual Big Days is always one of the most enjoyable days of the year, with this being right up there amongst our best ever. Every year is different and designing a route to match the year is a very fun challenge. It was also great to explore Shawano County for the first time, an area rich in habitat and rich in bird diversity. Over the years we have refined our routes to less driving and more time outside birding. This was our shortest route yet with the vast majority of our birding taking place in Shawano and Brown Counties. Big Days are almost as fun to look back on as they are to run, and we will remember this one for a really long time as the year we found the Western Kingbird and the Black-bellied Whistling-Duck.

Congrats if you made it to the end!

Tom Prestby
Green Bay

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Yesterday (May 21) myself, Quentin Yoerger, and Aaron Haycraft, AKA Team Good Godwits, ran our Big Day for the 2022 Great Wisconsin Birdathon. After a bizarre spring which brought a surge of neotropical migrants into southern Wisconsin in April and held them there for a couple weeks until the floodgates were open as wide as could be by several days in a row of 90s with strong south winds, we didnt know how things would go. We rely on late migrants arriving and early migrants lingering to find a lot of species and it seemed like that would be very difficult this year. So, we built a route which had a heavy focus on birds on their breeding territory and then some migrants later in the day. Things worked out very well as we ended up recording 196 species one shy of our best ever mark. This is the third route that we have found 190+ species on. It was probably the best birding day in Wisconsin of all three of our lives, with two stunning finds in between many other fun birds. Below i
s a descriptive narrative of the day. Enjoy! And if you're inspired, you can donate in honor of our team to bird conservation in Wisconsin at: https://charity.pledgeit.org/t/glstV6omzD?createdfbclidAR02cLx7NUkb-VmwISQcnSczb4GuwxpuRF02TuC2hK4A_rlSam8EFGiulPI
We started at midnight near Shawano Lake and found our first target, Eastern Screech-Owl. Barred Owls were talkative and Great Horneds were not, a trend which would hold true for the remainder of the night. Temps were chilly but it was a beautiful windless night to be out. Migrant chips were steady, so we knew birds were moving. We continued west and found a major target bird, a Northern Saw-whet Owl in a large conifer swamp south of Gresham. Efforts for Long-eared Owl came up empty, as they always do.
We arrived at Navarino Wildlife Area around 3am with plenty of time to work the marshes before the dawn chorus began. Another major target was cooperative, a Yellow Rail that we had staked out in the Navarino Sedge Meadow State Natural Area. In the flowages along McDonald Road we found Sora, Virginia Rail, and eventually both species of Bittern and Wilsons Snipe closer to daybreak. We finally caught up with a Great Horned Owl in the fields to the south, just before it was too light to hear them. A major highlight was just how abundant Whip-poor-wills are in this area. At times we joked about how we wish we could shut the Whip-poor-wills up to hear other species, but its fantastic that there are still some areas where this declining species thrives.
The dawn chorus is always my favorite part of a big day, giving that shot of energy you need after pulling an all-nighter. Our strategy is always to hit as many habitats as we can while birds are singing at their highest intensity, and Navarino is a wonderful place to do this with several habitat types in close proximity. Among many common species, we heard hoped-for Ruffed Grouse, Ring-necked Pheasant, Golden-winged Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on breeding territory as well as a few migrants like Canada Warbler and Swainsons Thrush. We easily saw the Ring-necked Ducks and Trumpeter Swans that breed on the flowages.
Just west of Navarino are the Wolf River Bottoms, and we stopped at the Highway 156 crossing and picked up Prothonotary Warbler on the northern edge of its range and a couple others like Brown Creeper. We birded our way north back toward Gresham and heard our stakeout Hooded Warbler (another species at the north edge of its range) plus some conifer swamp species including White-throated Sparrow in the same swamp we had found the Saw-whet in earlier.
We worked our way up to the deep woods of northern Shawano County where we picked up breeders including Yellow-rumped Warbler, Northern Parula, Black-throated Green Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Winter Wren, and Blue-headed Vireokey adds because most of these species are done migrating through in large numbers, and we never detected them again later in the day. We were lucky to spot a male Common Merganser sitting on a rock in the Wolf River, a great pickup since this early migrant has moved entirely out of the Green Bay area. We also watched a pair of Red-shouldered Hawks hunt which was a fun bonus and a makeup for missing them in their prime habitat in the Wolf River bottoms. Wind had picked up substantially now, which made hearing difficult and may have been the reason we missed some breeders such as Hermit Thrush and Purple Finch.
Next up was some large open areas in the northern part of Shawano County between Red River and Middle Village. We had hoped to check Eastern Meadowlark off the list and stopped the car when a medium-sized yellow bird was fluttering in the field on Mission Lake and East Town Hall Rds. A look in the binocs was initially confusing because this bird was not right for a meadowlark it was a WESTERN KINGBIRD!! We leisurely watched this rarity for about ten minutes and celebrated only the second time each of us have seen this species in Wisconsin. Seeing a rare bird that you know is present is awesome, but the thrill of finding a rarity is one of the most fun feelings in birding. After saying our thanks and goodbyes to the kingbird, we checked off other targets like Grasshopper Sparrow but missed Vesper Sparrow in multiple spots.
We headed east to Shawano Lake, which I consider one of the most under-birded locations in the state. This large lake right before the north woods is a magnet to migrating waterfowl but heavy boat traffic makes birding difficult during weekends. We added a nesting Osprey, Common and Black Terns, Bufflehead, two surprise Sanderlings at the County Park beach, and Red-headed Woodpeckers and a roosting Common Nighthawk in the large oaks at the County Park. We could not find any of the resident loons due to boat traffic and distortion and waves.
We continued working toward Green Bay, and the next stop was the wetland and grassland complex at Oneida Nation where we started at the pond along Reformatory Road. We added common shorebird species including Wilsons Phalarope, as well as our first Hooded Mergansers, Shovelers, Ruddy Ducks, and Lesser Scaup of the day. The grasslands added hunting Northern Harriers and a late Rough-legged Hawk among the common grassland breeding species. The Western Meadowlark that was present the past two years has not returned this year and we could not find Henslows Sparrow or Brewers Blackbird. We may have had the latter on a post way way way out in our scopes, but it was just too far away to be sure. The Oneida Nation has done a terrific job with restoration efforts here, and this location is only getting better as a regional birding hotspot.
Next it was time to hit lower Green Bay, a sure boost of our stats since we needed a lot of shorebirds and waterbirds. Various locations produced shorebirds we were hoping for including Hudsonian Godwits (Good Godwits our teams namesake cooperated!), White-rumped Sandpipers, Black-bellied Plovers, Ruddy Turnstones, and many others. We also scored on several lingering ducks despite the mass exodus which occurred in last weeks heatwave, including American Wigeon, American Black Duck, Canvasback, Red-breasted Merganser, and Greater Scaup. Shorebirds were occasionally ambushed by the local Peregrine Falcon, making sorting through them difficult but adding that key species to our list. Marshbirds that are much more common in the marshes of Green Bay than anywhere else in the region including Common Gallinule, Forsters Tern, and Yellow-headed Blackbird were easily found.
It was late afternoon and time to strategize as we sat at just short of 180 species. A big hole in our list was migrating passerines, so the natural thought was to try Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary. A sunny Saturday afternoon is the worst time to possibly try this due to the crowds of people and typical inactivity of birds during this time of day, but we had a tip that it was a good morning there for migrants. The beginning of our walk was very quiet but just past the Nature Center we found a very nice group of migrants in the sun and out of the wind and crowds including our first Bay-breasted Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Gray-cheeked Thrush, Philadelphia Vireo, and Olive-sided Flycatcher of the day. The success here was unexpected and made us realize that we were possibly on our way to having one of our better days ever in terms of a species total.
Next up was the UW-Green Bay campus where the Orchard Oriole was at its typical spot on the now closed golf course and hopefully soon-to-be restored oak savannah and a Coopers Hawk gave a lucky flyover. Speaking of lucky flyovers, we decided to spend a minute near the Union where there are a lot of spruce trees that have been hosting White-winged Crossbills during this incredible past winter and spring for this irruptive species. Although most of them have gone back north, some birders have still been reporting them so we thought it was worth a shot. After a couple minutes a pair flew over calling, a great addition of a species we have never recorded on a big day. We would surprisingly end up missing Pine Siskin on the day, but this was a welcome substitute.
With the clock ticking and our morales high, we headed to Manitowoc to close out the day. We were able to relocate the Common Goldeneye others had seen earlier in the Little Manitowoc Slough as well as the Willet in the impoundment. A second Willet joined and the two were very loud the whole time we were there. There werent many other shorebirds around so we scoped the gulls on the breakwall in hopes that a flock of Whimbrels might migrate in on this evening with East winds off the lake (alas, they never did). Two Lesser Black-backed and an Iceland Gull made nice additions and we were content to start walking back to our cars after a really fun day and a rock-solid total of 195 species. Little did we know, it wasnt over. A few moments later, a bird with a strange silhouette in the fading light flew overwas it a duck? Maybe, but why did it look so different? A cormorant? No. An ibis? No. It then gave a really cool bizarre call that none of us are familiar with so we knew this was a
rare bird that we had to figure out. It called another couple times and then banked, revealing white wing watches and a bright pink bill a BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK!! It settled down in the harbor and then flew right over us into the impoundment to roost for the night. A second huge surprise of the day and a story book way to cap it off. This species was extremely rare in Wisconsin until about a decade ago, and is now being seen increasingly, although its still a rather rare bird in the state. As giddy as could be, we ended our day on that high note with 196 species as darkness fell over Lake Michigan.
The annual Big Days is always one of the most enjoyable days of the year, with this being right up there amongst our best ever. Every year is different and designing a route to match the year is a very fun challenge. It was also great to explore Shawano County for the first time, an area rich in habitat and rich in bird diversity. Over the years we have refined our routes to less driving and more time outside birding. This was our shortest route yet with the vast majority of our birding taking place in Shawano and Brown Counties. Big Days are almost as fun to look back on as they are to run, and we will remember this one for a really long time as the year we found the Western Kingbird and the Black-bellied Whistling-Duck.
Congrats if you made it to the end!
Tom Prestby
Green Bay

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My husband and I live near the Goose Pond and had the good fortune to meet
Judy, and Spence -- who let us view through his scope. Thank you!
The Goose Pond is bisected by a road which runs through the middle of it,
dividing it into an "east pond" and a "west pond". If you are on this road
facing north, the "west pond" will be to your left.

Diane & Alan Harvey
Windsor/DeForest
Dane County

On Sun, May 22, 2022 at 5:40 PM Chris Costello [email removed] wrote:

> Spence, what's west pond?
> On Sun, May 22, 2022, 5:06 PM Spence Stehno [email removed]
> wrote:
>
> > Currently five redneck phaloropes on West pond in northeast corner p
> >
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> >
> >
> >
>
>
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Spence, what's west pond?
On Sun, May 22, 2022, 5:06 PM Spence Stehno [email removed] wrote:

> Currently five redneck phaloropes on West pond in northeast corner p
>
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Currently five redneck phaloropes on West pond in northeast corner p

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Good morning,
Blackburnian Warblers were plentiful this spring, however Cape May Warblers
were not. Both birds are very stunning and unfortunately, I did not get to
see a breeding plumage male Cape May this spring. First time that has
happened to me. If you would like to see some pictures, they can be found
at the link below. Have a great day!

Blackburnian & Cape May Warblers in May ’22 – Jeremy Meyer Photography
(jmeyerphotography.net)
<https://www.jmeyerphotography.net/blackburnian-cape-may-warblers-in-may-22/>


Jeremy Meyer
Franklin, Milwaukee
http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/

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Jim Frank photographed adult Laughing and California Gulls in the Port Washington Harbor on Saturday evening 5/21/22.


Mark Korducki, New Berlin
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Good afternoon,
Mourning Warblers have been abundant in the Milwaukee area this spring. I
have even seen a couple of females. Photos can be seen at the link below.
Have a great evening!

Mourning Warblers in May ’22 – Jeremy Meyer Photography
(jmeyerphotography.net)
<https://www.jmeyerphotography.net/mourning-warblers-in-may-22/>


Jeremy Meyer
Franklin, Milwaukee
http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/

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At about 12 noon there were two Dunlin in an eroded area adjacent to the soccer field just south of the water treatment plant on Lake Michigan. Erosion has caused the grass slope to cave in and has created a small muddy beach where the birds are feeding.

Judith Huf
Milwaukee####################
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A single bird appeared at a feeder for a couple minutes and then flew off-
I did not re-find the bird-
Dan Panetti
S.E. OZ county


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Good morning,
I have finished going through these warbler photos from the last few weeks
and thought I would share them with you. Photos can be seen at the link
below.

https://www.jmeyerphotography.net/golden-winged-blue-winged-brewsters-warblers-in-may-22/


Jeremy Meyer
Franklin, Milwaukee
www.jmeyerphotography.net


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Hello,
They aren't perfect, but they're clear and fun. Click below if you are
interested in viewing any of them.

Wilson's Phalarope family in Milwaukee County
https://youtu.be/S2kb1FeS9yk

Black-necked Stilt in Racine County
https://youtu.be/7t0v8-F7Cj8

Short-billed Dowitcher in Racine County
https://youtu.be/hs3jCXj7yUg

--
Jennifer Ambrose
Bayview, Milwaukee County


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Details here: https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35574
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: [email removed]
Date: Thu, May 19, 2022 at 7:30 PM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Wisconsin Rare Bird Alert
To: [email removed]


*** Species Summary:

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (5 Dodge)
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (fulgens) (1 Dodge)
Fulvous Whistling-Duck (1 Dane)
Trumpeter Swan (1 Brown, 1 Door, 1 Iowa)
Tundra Swan (1 Burnett)
American Wigeon (1 Langlade)
American Black Duck (3 Racine)
Canvasback (13 Dane)
Ring-necked Duck (3 Portage)
Harlequin Duck (1 Sheboygan)
Ruddy Duck (2 Bayfield)
Ruffed Grouse (1 Buffalo)
Chukar (4 Dane)
Red-necked Grebe (3 Dodge)
Eared Grebe (2 Dodge)
King Rail (1 Winnebago)
Common Gallinule (1 Manitowoc)
Yellow Rail (1 Bayfield)
Black-necked Stilt (2 Racine, 2 Waukesha, 2 Winnebago)
Upland Sandpiper (1 Chippewa)
Hudsonian Godwit (2 Brown, 5 Dane, 1 Manitowoc)
Ruddy Turnstone (1 Waukesha)
Sanderling (2 Marathon)
White-rumped Sandpiper (2 Brown, 3 Portage)
Long-billed Dowitcher (11 Columbia, 9 Dane)
Red-necked Phalarope (1 Dane, 1 Fond du Lac, 1 Sauk)
Solitary Sandpiper (1 Monroe)
Laughing Gull (1 Manitowoc)
Common Tern (1 Dodge)
American White Pelican (1 Milwaukee)
Least Bittern (1 Dane)
Snowy Egret (3 Dodge)
Little Blue Heron (21 Dane)
Glossy Ibis (2 Winnebago)
Red-shouldered Hawk (1 Fond du Lac, 1 Kewaunee, 1 Outagamie, 1 Washington)
Rough-legged Hawk (1 Fond du Lac, 1 Manitowoc, 1 Marinette, 1 Winnebago)
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (1 Adams, 1 Dane, 1 Fond du Lac, 1 La Crosse, 2
Waukesha)
Acadian Flycatcher (2 Dane)
Bell's Vireo (5 Dane, 5 Sauk)
Philadelphia Vireo (6 Dane, 1 Grant, 1 Outagamie, 9 Sauk, 1 Vernon)
Common Raven (5 Columbia, 1 Green Lake)
Tufted Titmouse (1 Shawano)
Purple Finch (1 Winnebago)
Common Redpoll (1 Ashland)
White-winged Crossbill (1 Brown)
Grasshopper Sparrow (1 Green Lake)
Harris's Sparrow (1 Bayfield)
Yellow-breasted Chat (1 Dane, 1 Dodge, 3 Jefferson)
Brewer's Blackbird (2 Sauk)
Louisiana Waterthrush (1 Adams)
Connecticut Warbler (1 Dane, 1 Richland, 1 Sauk)
Hooded Warbler (1 Columbia, 1 Dane)
Cerulean Warbler (1 Milwaukee)
Pine Warbler (1 Dane, 1 La Crosse)
Summer Tanager (1 Dane)
Blue Grosbeak (1 Ozaukee)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the Wisconsin Rare Bird Alert. The
report below shows observations of rare birds in Wisconsin. View or
unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35574
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully.
Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and
respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information
visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Steve Holzman
Grafton, WI


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Good afternoon,
I finished going through the spring Black-throated Blue Warblers and
thought I would share with you. Photos can be seen at the link below. Have
a great night!

Black-throated Blue Warblers in May ’22 – Jeremy Meyer Photography
(jmeyerphotography.net)
<https://www.jmeyerphotography.net/black-throated-blue-warblers-in-may-22/>


Jeremy Meyer
Franklin, Milwaukee
http://www.jmeyerphotography.net/

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Greetings;
While birding Whitnall a couple days ago I happened upon a leucistic
warbler - At first I was thinking american redstart (female) but now I"m
not so sure. It may not be identifiable. Would love your input. The bird
was quite far from me, so it's not the clearest of photos, but I didn't
want to miss the photo by trying to get closer. Good thing too, cuz it was
gone about as fast as it flew in. The white in the eye is from the auto
flash on my camera.

You can find the photo here: https://flic.kr/p/2nmNcFr

Cheers
Kelly Goocher
mke


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Last updated: 9/22/2021

 

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Last updated: 9/22/2021

 

This is a copy of the email Welcome Message all subscribers receive when they join the list.

 


Welcome to the Wisconsin Birding Network (WISBIRDN), a discussion list owned and operated by the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology comprised of persons interested in Wisconsin birds and birding.

 

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The WSO is the list owner and the admin will field technical and non-technical questions, suggestions, notions, and ideas, about WISBIRDN. Please be mindful that the list is run on a volunteer basis so if an answer is not immediately forthcoming (we do not have operators standing by 24/7) please be patient.

 

Thank you for reading these guidelines (which you have already safely copied and saved, right?). Welcome and good birding!

 

Sunil Gopalan - WSO Admin/List Owner webadmin@wsobirds.org Middleton, WI (Dane County)

 

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NOTE: Every member who posts to WISBIRDN is REQUIRED to sign each and every post with a signature block containing first and last name. Pseudonyms or false names are not permitted. Wisconsin residents must also include their city and county of residence; out of state subscribers need only include their state of residence.